no i do not
blameaspartame:


"Two roads diverged in a yellow wood …"

blameaspartame:

"Two roads diverged in a yellow wood …"

my bed is so comfortcore

so sleepwave

very cozypunk

marras6:

zaccharine:

honestly my favorite thing ive ever made in photoshop is catloaf

image

my graphic arts teacher hung it on the wall in the ga computer lab

the world needs more loaf animals

two days until birthday

two days until birthday

261,843 plays

snager-dragon:

kuueater:

send this to your ex with no context

(x)

done

shiiiiiiiit I gotta pick between SMT nocturne, digital devil saga one or two, or devil summoner one or two….

why there gotta be five crazy japanese devil games I wanna play

if you ever want to hear the neon genesis evangelion theme at any time just call 309-889-0497

fiendswithbenefits:

zchr:

i just set it up and it seems to be working

if you’re at the club and someone asks for your number just give them this

rhamphotheca:

First Live Observations of a Rarely Seen Deep Sea Anglerfish

by Dana Lacono (August, 2012)

With a bulbous body and spiky scales, a shaggy lure dangling from its head, and foot-like fins that it uses to “walk” along the seafloor, the deep-sea anglerfish Chaunacops coloratus looks like something out of a Dr. Seuss book.

In a recent paper, MBARI researcher Lonny Lundsten and his coauthors describe the first observations of these rare fish in their natural, deep-sea habitat. In addition to documenting these fish walking on the seafloor and fishing with their built-in lures, the researchers discovered that the fish change color from blue to red as they get older.

C. coloratus was first described from a single specimen collected off the coast of Panama during an expedition in 1891 aboard the U.S. Fish Commission steamer Albatross. However, for over 100 years, marine researchers collected deep-sea fish using trawl nets and dredges, so this anglerfish was never seen alive. That changed in 2002, when researchers from MBARI, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary used the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Tiburon to explore Davidson Seamount—an extinct volcano off the coast of Central California…

(read more: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute)

captainstormwind:

the truth is out there.